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Weekly Update: Sinking Le Corbusier Edition

What we were reading about this week, from a floating sculpture in Denmark, to a Leonardo da Vinci controversy.

Our Weekly Update is here to bring you our favorite links from the past week: art and design news you might have missed, must-see stories, and the best new contests and calls for entry.

Sinking a Le Corbusier in a Danish fjord

As part of the Floating Art Festival currently taking place in Denmark, organized by the Vejle Museum, artist Asmund Havsteen-Mikkelsen has created a 1:1 replica of Le Corbusier’s famous Villa Savoye… and left it to sink. Havsteen-Mikkelsen’s replica sits partially submerged in the Vjele Fjord, as if slowly sinking underwater. The artist says the work, titled Flooding Modernity, is a comment on how modern democracy has “sunk.” More on Dezeen.

“More Leonardoesque than Leonardo himself”

Hyperallergic sits down for a chat with Oxford art historian Matthew Landrus, who’s challenged the attribution of a circa-1500 painting, Salvator Mundi, which Christie’s has billed as “one of fewer than 20 known paintings” from da Vinci. Via Hyperallergic:

“Landrus made headlines this week for his controversial appraisal of “Salvator Mundi,” which he says is probably between only 5% and 20% painted by Leonardo. He notes that the rest of the painting is likely the work of Bernardino Luini, a studio assistant of Da Vinci.”

Documenta 14 CEO cleared of financial wrongdoing after $6.3 million deficit

The controversy around the 2017 edition of documenta, the quinquennial German art exhibition typically held in Kassel, is a convoluted one. After the event ran into financial difficulties, they had to look to the city of Kassel, as well as the state of Hesse, for a cash infusion. Then Germany’s far-right AfD party got involved. Art News has the latest update on the story:

“An investigation into the budget shortfall was launched after members of Germany’s populist AfD party in Kassel’s city council filed a lawsuit against [documenta CEO Annette] Kulenkampff and curator Adam Szymczyk, accusing the pair of embezzlement and mismanaging public funds. The investigation closed on July 30 after the prosecutor’s office examined the accusations made against Kulenkampff, members of the event’s supervisory board, and Szymczyk, concluding that there was no evidence of criminal conduct.”

A vandalized Liverpool artwork remembering dead migrants and refugees is restored

After a public art project in Liverpool was torn down, for reasons still unclear to its creators, the piece has been reinstalled. Via The Art Newspaper:

“The List project has gone back on show in Liverpool after it was torn down last month from hoardings on Great George Street. The piece was reinstalled on Monday (5 August). The work documents the 34,361 names of asylum seekers, refugees and migrants who have died trying to get to Europe since 1993, is a key work in the Liverpool Biennial (until 28 October).

"The work remains vulnerable however, a biennial spokeswoman says. ‘The site continues to be a target but we are doing everything we can to ensure that The List is presented for the remainder of Liverpool Biennial 2018, so that more people have the opportunity to come into contact with it,’ she adds.”

Twitter account of the week: Hey, art friends

Hey, art friends is a must-follow account for anyone interested in staying up to date on calls for entry, residency opportunities, and job postings in the creative community. The calls they round up are diverse, with options for creators of all kinds, and located in a variety of regions.

Cover image of work by Asmund Havsteen-Mikkelsen via Dezeen.

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