Productivity Tips for Photographers Working from Home

Has COVID-19 changed the way you work? Maximize your work-from-home setup with these productivity tips.

working from home

If you work in your own studio, you’re the boss. You are used to working alone, so the coronavirus has simply limited the number of things and places you can photograph. However, if you work within a bigger team, in large projects, the current COVID-19 working arrangement can prove difficult for you to adjust. Sometimes the work just doesn’t get done. Staying creative, motivated, and organized when you are stuck alone at home can be almost impossible. But you still have to make a living, so you have to gather yourself up and adapt to the new normal. We’ve rounded up these six productivity tips for photographers working from home:

1. Don’t waste time on the internet

Social media can be alluring when you have no one looking over your shoulder. Don’t give it a chance. Be the boss and hold yourself accountable. If you are editing photos on your computer, don’t open another tab no matter what. Many people swear that they are doing it as a one-time thing but before they know it, the internet has sucked them whole into a world they can’t escape. If you spend two hours of your workday watching YouTube videos, for example, you might have to work late into the night in order to complete your to-do list, which then wears you out so you feel like you need to watch another video to relax, and the cycle continues. There are lots of helpful apps that can block specific sites from both your phone and your laptop if you need a bit of external reinforcement.

2. Create a separate working space

Minor home remodeling is really important if working from home is going to be a long-term solution for you. Not only does it make your place more comfortable (and IG-worthy), it can take your space from fine to functional. As a photographer, you might not need to remodel your kitchen or bathroom, you could repurpose a small corner in the house (or an entire room) to become your new home office. A dedicated home office will help you to get focused and encourage productivity. Maybe you’ll need to knock a wall down, or maybe all you need is to invest in a good desk and an ergonomic chair.

3. Create your own content

People are stuck in their homes; there aren’t any social events to attend and basically no one to take photos of. You don’t have to worry about the lack of photography gigs though. You can create a YouTube channel and share tips and tricks with upcoming photographers. If you post helpful content and optimize it across all search engines and social media platforms, you will be able to create an audience eventually the channel will start generating passive income for you. For other ideas, check out our guide to making money as a photographer during COVID-19.

4. Stay organized

Ensure that all your supplies for your day-to-day tasks are on hand; pens, notebooks, laptop, highlighters, printers, photography tools and equipment, everything you might need! Keep your workstation organized in order to keep your creativity and productivity at a maximum.

5. Find at-home photo opportunities

You can find great images to capture wherever you are. If you challenge your creativity, you won’t need to travel to far-off locations to find photogenic material worthy of a global audience. You can: · Photograph food or the ingredients you use to make your meals. Take your social media or YouTube audience through your cooking routine through photography. · Take photos of your indoor garden. You can even hire a freelance writer to collaborate with in writing the story behind your garden and then share it on your photography blog. · Photograph your lawn, balcony, or any outdoor space. · Photograph oil or water or both of them together. You can add a light source, e.g. an incandescent lamp to make the picture appear more sophisticated. · Take minimalistic photos. A simple photo of the lone tree in your backyard or a photo of your office can tell a story.

6. Try something new

There are tons of photography challenges and projects shared online by photography organizations and personalities, some of which come with cash prizes. We’ve rounded up some of our favourites. You could also use this time to learn more about photography through YouTube or an online photography class.