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10 Artists Proving that Print’s Not Dead

We asked artists to submit work inspired by the medium of print. Here are the best pieces we found.

For our July edition of Format Picks, our ongoing creative contest series, we asked you to send in work inspired by the theme: print’s not dead. From graphic design projects to analog photography to printed books, we saw loads of fascinating submissions.

Our winner for July’s edition of Format Picks was photographer Josh Nice, who stood out with a mesmerizing GIF of one of his self-printed photo zines. He’s won a $500 voucher to print his work through Newspaper Club.

We couldn’t resist sharing some more of July’s standout entries with you as well. Below, find our favorite picks from last month’s contest.

Entry is open for our latest edition of Format Picks. We’re accepting submissions until August 31.

Tiago Lima

“This photograph was taken in a cellulose industrial park located close to the Atlantic forest in northeast Brazil. The hard contrast between the facade and the large print depicted in this image is an ironic reminder that the print is not dead but our forest might be.”

www.tiagolima.com

Kaitlin Molchen

“This image is titled ‘John’s Navy Uniform’ and is from my series Daydreaming of You. This body of work shows my grandparents love story through the eyes of their grandchild. I photographed not only my grandparents but the objects that make up their story. The love letters, his navy uniform, her wedding dress, the Bible my grandmother gifted my grandfather when he was in the navy, these physical objects that reflect their story. I chose to shoot only medium format film on my Hasselblad and Mamiya for this project because I wanted to slow down. I wanted to spend time with the people, places & things to better understand their memories together. Shooting film helped me achieve that and has continued to help in this way in many different projects as well.”

www.kaitlinmolchen.com

Paul Rae Gibson

“This is a collage. My work, for its final effect, needs to always be printed.”

www.paularaegibson.com

Alice de Kruijs

“This body of work symbolizes the artificial world of beauty and plastic fashion standards. I used a technique of printing and photographing it again to create a new image.”

www.alicedekruijs.com

Marie-Yaé Suematsu

“My work is essentially about drawing on diverse support media such as paper, ceramic, fabric… I like to see how an image reacts through different techniques. For instance this image is a monochrome risoprint of a photograph from Billy Thomassin of one of my porcelain vases on which I drew two women, one whispering something to the other. I was very pleased with Billy’s photographs, but when I tried to print them it felt weird to see them in color. Then I tried the risoprinter and I loved the result because it feels like all of it— the vase, the flowers, the characters, their reflection—was a drawing. Print is definitely not dead. It brings the images back to life in our hands.”

www.marie-yae.tumblr.com

Tintin Cooper

“This is a painting from a series all based on printed newspaper images, and reinterpreted into simple lines and colors by myself. The original newspaper images are of sportsmen, footballers and celebrities.”

www.tintincooper.com

Paige Lyons

“My collage was constructed from digital photographs taken at my city of residence at the time, Norwich, and from a visit to Amsterdam during the summer. The aim was to contrast and compare public spaces that I inhabited daily in Norwich, with ones I briefly visited on trips and holidays; investigating how cities are designed to function as networks and cultural spaces. Creating collages from my printed photographs allowed me to explore these ideas freely and creatively to speculate on new or alternative city spaces.”

www.paigelyons.format.com

Yi Jing Zhou

“This image shows a few pages from a zine project that I did. I was very frustrated with the constant misprints, because I was printing in double-sided but the images did not align on both sides of the paper so I could not finish binding the zine. That’s when I tried arranging and reading them in different orientations and that brought about interesting outcomes. I feel that with design and craftsmanship, we are always looking for perfection, but learning to embrace the imperfections often give us pleasant surprises, if not at least some form of relief and reminder that it is okay to fail. This is the kind of mistake and surprise that I would not have encountered if not for the process of printing. The tactile quality of flipping through paper and arranging with real materials in hands is never going to lose its charm. If anything, those qualities are only magnified in today’s digital age.”

www.not-seriously.format.com

Mariam Soliman

“The love of print is a love hard to explain, but surely a love to immerse oneself in. This picture depicts that love.”

www.mariamsoliman.com

The best of previous Format Picks editions:
How 10 Artists Document Their Travels
How 10 Artists See the Environment Around Them
How 10 Artists See The City

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