Everything About Starting Your Product Photography Business

What Is Product Photography?

Product photography is a branch of photography that involves photographing products with the intention of displaying, promoting, and highlighting certain features of a product. 

Today, most commonly, product photography is utilized on e-commerce stores or on social media. 


History of Product Photography


Product photography existed before the age of the internet. 

We can trace product photography back to when photography and advertising met, which is most often considered the early 20th century. 

During this time, product photography was most often used in advertising catalogs for the military. These catalogs were different from competitors because not only did they provide the specifics of the products being sold, but they also provided customers with images of what they would be purchasing.  

From here, fashion and textiles manufacturers started using product photography, but we didn’t truly see product photography boom until 1909 when Conde Nast acquired Vogue and started advertising products in the pages of its magazine. 


Product Photography Today

No longer do you just see product photography in the pages of magazines. Product photography is everywhere, from the advertisements you see when scrolling on Instagram to the clothing pieces you purchase when browsing your favorite shops. It’s hard to go anywhere without seeing product photography in some way, shape, or form. 

In some instances, you’ll find that product photography is very bare-bones, highlighting only the most important features of the product (i.e. tech products). In other instances, product photography can involve styling, which you’ll often see utilized in fashion products or home decor items. 

Product photography is also commonly referred to as commercial photography; however, be careful not to confuse commercial photography with commercial real estate photography.

iphone

Photography can shape their first impression. For products, this is especially important because the image is used to entice consumers to purchase their products. A great product photography portfolio can attract people to browse longer and attract the right audience as well. For example, if you’re an environmentally friendly product, you may opt for colors and backgrounds that contain nature, wood, or plants. Now, if you want to convey a minimalistic lifestyle, you may consider using a simple white background to avoid distraction in the image. 

Product photography is more than snapshots of images laid out on display. There are different ways to ensure the images are engaging, the products stand out, and convert customers to buy the products. In this guide, we’re going to help kickstart your online portfolio.

We always recommend that photographers try establishing themselves in a certain niche. In photography, you have plenty to choose from, including portrait photography, wildlife photography, real estate photography, and yes, product photography. 

Whether you’re an established photographer looking to get more specific with clientele, or you’re an aspiring photographer who wants to enter the industry with a specific niche in mind, this article will help you determine whether product photography is the right path for you.

What is Product Photography?

As a product photographer, you have a lot of responsibility. Not only do you need to ensure that your images look good in terms of the quality of your photos, but you also have to ensure that your pictures highlight all the best features of the product. 

While customers will read product descriptions, anyone who has spent any time online shopping will know, the product image is usually what captures your attention first. 

And so, with that in mind, let’s take a closer look at what it means to be a product photographer by going over some of the requirements that will help you be successful.

floating guitar pick

Product photographers pay attention to small details 

Whether it’s the zipper on a dress or the sleek design of a new laptop, product photographers never miss a detail. They know how to photograph products so they not only look their best but also so they encourage customers to make a purchase. 


Product photographers understand angles

All photographers should have a firm grip on utilizing angles in their images, but product photographers particularly need to know how to capture a product from all the best angles. This is especially true if we’re talking about small products that are awkward to photograph. 


Products photographers understand vision 

Often, product photographers are hired by brands, product developers, or small business owners to photograph products. Because of this, product photographers rarely have creative control over how they shoot products. 

Instead, product photographers need to be able to listen to a client’s vision and execute that vision in a way that makes the client happy. Depending on your experience you may be included in the discussions with the client, or creative director on how to best bring their vision to life, or you may be given complete creative freedom, but this last option is a rare treat. 


Product photographs have strong styling capabilities 

While not every job will require styling, on occasion, product photographers will be called to help style a product. 

Product photographers who have strong photography skills and styling skills are uniquely qualified to create beautiful images that not only highlight the product but also portray it in a flattering manner that is more likely to sell (i.e. a picture of a couch with a plain white backdrop versus the couch in a fully styled living room with throw pillows, blankets, and other decor items).

What are the Different Types of Product Photography?

In general, most product photographers have experience with all the different types of product photography. The only exception being some product photographers will specifically focus on the clean-cut, white backdrop images that show off the features of a product, while other product photographers are more drawn to the highly stylized images. 

Generally speaking, if you’re interested in building a career as a product photographer, you should have experience with all the different types of product photography. 

Here’s an overview of the different types of product photography you should know: 


Individual shots 

This is probably the most important photo you’ll take. It’s the hero image featured in product catalogs, on the homepage of a website, throughout product pages, and even in a newsletter. 

The individual shot only has one product in the frame and its goal is to be clean, crisp, and attention-worthy without being distracting. 


Group shots

While individual shots are most often used for selling purposes, on occasion, clients require a group shot of various products. For example, if they sell gift boxes or products kits. In addition, sometimes, clients want to display a variety of their products in one image for social media or on the banner of their website.

Knowing how to arrange a grouping of items so they are displayed well is essential for a product photographer. 


Lifestyle shots

This is where product photographers’ styling capabilities come into play. 

All about displaying the product in action, a lifestyle shot might be a man wearing a new style of jeans while out for a walk, or a woman on her brand new computer in a cafe setting. 

Lifestyle shots often require you to work with a model, which means having some experience with portrait photography or editorial photography will help you.

coffee beans

Scale shots 

Don’t forget, product photography is all about trying to sell a product to someone without them having the product physically in front of them. Because of this, most customers have a difficult time judging how big or small a product might be. 

Product photographers need to be skilled with photographing products in a scene to help give customers an idea of the product's size. Again, this is where styling skills can come into play. 


Detailed shots

If you’re working with small products like jewelry or tech gadgets like earbuds, you’ll need to know how to take detailed shots that are clear. There is nothing that will make a shot look worse than blurry imagery. 

You will need to have good knowledge of lighting and camera settings for these shots, as well as special equipment like a macro lens. 


Packaging shots 

You won’t always be required to shoot packaging, but in some instances, customers care about those extra details, like what packaging their purchase will come in. In these instances, making the packaging look like an appealing part of the whole purchase is important. 

This is especially important if you’re working with a brand that sells subscription boxes. The box itself can become a part of the whole purchasing experience. 


 Can I specialize in a type of product photography?


As we mentioned above, if you want to be successful as a product photographer, you will want to be skilled in all the types of product photography we just mentioned. Having said that, this doesn’t mean you can’t differentiate yourself as a product photographer in other ways. Namely, we recommend specializing in the type of products you photograph. 

For example, perhaps you specialize in tech products. Or maybe you want to specialize in houseware. You can even niche down to specifically photographing women’s clothing rather than all types of clothing. 

You also might naturally find your product photography niche by working with certain types of clients. For example, if you take photographs of clothing for a women’s clothing boutique, they will likely continue receiving new products every week. In this case, you’ll be able to continually shoot women’s clothing, building your portfolio in this specific style of product photograph. 

You don’t necessarily have to get this specific, but it is a good thing to keep in mind if you want to differentiate yourself as a product photographer.

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What are the Best Cameras for Product Photography?

The good news when it comes to choosing a camera for product photography is that you don't necessarily have to have the fanciest, most expensive model on the market. Sure, a high-end DSLR camera may produce a slightly better product image compared to a good quality mirrorless camera if you look at them side by side. But the fact is, this type of photography typically takes place in an environment where you have a great deal of control over the setting and lighting conditions, so there's no real need for the biggest, most sensitive sensor.

Having said that, if you have the budget for it, a higher-end DSLR camera can make creating the best product photos out there a little bit easier. Some of the best product photography cameras at a range of budgets include:

1) Nikon D7200, $1099.95

The Nikon D7200 is proof you don't have to spend top dollar for a camera body that performs like its professional counterparts. While it's part of Nikon's DX cropped sensor range (you can go for full sensor Nikon D750, $1499.95, if you prefer the larger sensor), it's noted for its excellent low light performance and can even shoot HD video. This means you can also offer short product clips as part of your product photography portfolio.

The best part about this Nikon camera that makes it an incredibly handy tool is its range of wifi and NFC connectivity options. This means you can quickly transfer photos from your camera to a laptop or other device to make selections on the go, and it also allows you to control the camera remotely from a phone or tablet which can come in handy on a product photography shoot when you want the camera to be as still as possible for a crisp final image

2) Canon EOS Rebel T7i, $749.99

The Rebel T7i has a rotary screen that we promise you'll find handy on set when shooting product photos. It's easy to use even if you're not accustomed to Canon, has a highly praised autofocus, and produces sharp, high quality images in a range of lighting conditions.

3) Sony A6000, $399.99

While this mirrorless camera body from Sony has been on the market since 2014, it remains a favorite among pros and amateurs alike. The best part is that since newer mirrorless models have been released by Sony, the price has come down on this fantastic body making it a great choice for someone looking to get into taking product photos without spending a fortune.

It has a great ISO range meaning you'll be able to capture high quality images in a range of conditions before they get too noisy, can capture video, and has a well-reviewed 24.3 MP sensor that will bring those detailed texture shots to life.

camera lens

Which Lens is Best for Product Photography?

While there are a lot of product photography tips out there about which lens to choose, lens choices are personal to every photographer, so it's never a bad idea to rent a few different options to test them out before making a purchase decision, particularly if opting for an expensive lens.

When it comes to choosing lenses for e-commerce product photography, you may need a few different types in your camera pack. You'll probably reach for lenses with minimal distortion or compression since products look best when rendered in their real proportions. You might also want to have a macro lens on hand for detailed shots and texture shots. While prime lenses will be sharper, a good zoom lens can come in very handy when you're alternating between detailed shots and regular shots.

1) Canon EF 100mm f/2.8L IS USM, $1299.00

By no means a budget option, this lens makes it onto many best-lens lists for good reason. The money is worth the photos you can get out of the EF 100mm f/2.8, which is one of Canon's sharpest lenses. It handles beautifully, and manual focus is a breeze, which you'll appreciate when focusing on minute details. As a macro lens, it will also capture the texture and small objects very well. This will come in especially handy if you shoot jewelry or other small products.

2) Nikon AF-S Nikkor 50mm f/1.8G Lens, $216.95

This affordable option from Nikon is light, easy to use, and has a 50mm focal length that corresponds with the natural field of view making it appropriate for a wide range of subjects. This makes it a versatile choice for your lens kit that you'll reach for again and again.

3) Sony FE 24-70mm f/2.8, $1998.00

This versatile wide angle to short telephoto lens covers just about all the bases you'll need as a product photographer, and while the price tag is high, you can think of it as multiple lenses in one given its range. It's notable for its sharpness and high resolution, and performs well in just about any lighting setup.

What Other Equipment Do I Need for Product Photography?

Once you have a camera body you love and some lenses for the job, there are a few other pieces of equipment you'll likely use again and again. Product photography often takes place in the studio (even if it's a home studio), so some studio equipment can make all the difference between a mediocre photo and one that's truly memorable.

Add these pieces of equipment to your set up for perfect product images every time:

  • A tether. If your camera has fast wifi or NFC connectivity like some of the bodies we looked at, a tether isn't necessary, but for most camera bodies on the market, it's best to have a cable for shooting tethered. It's super handy to be able to see your images on your computer screen as you take them or to use live view if your camera allows it. This way, you can adjust things like your background, fill light, and products until everything looks perfect before taking the shot.

  • An excellent light source. If you're blessed with a place to shoot with a window that has lots of natural light, you'll probably shoot in natural light often. Still, it's nice to have some lighting options in case your shoot is scheduled on a cloudy day or you run out of daylight hours. This also gives you more control over the final look than shooting in natural light. A good light source for product photos could be a studio strobe, which will help you achieve hard shadows that full natural light creates. Some fill light options such as softboxes can also come in handy if you want to soften those shadows, depending on the style your customers want. A reflector card can also come in handy for brightening dark parts of your shot without an extra lighting source.

  • A tripod. You'll find you use a tripod often when taking product photographs since it allows you to keep your image framed the way you like as you adjust different aspects of the scene. It will also allow you to shoot in challenging product photography lighting since you'll be able to get away with a longer shutter speed.

  • Backgrounds. A standard white background is a must, but having a variety of background colors and textures that your customers can choose from will set your photography business apart. The background can be seamless paper, tile, painted plywood, textured wallpaper, fabric — the options are really vast, and you can get creative with what you use.

  • Plinths and risers. These can be wooden or acrylic, and come in very handy when it comes to adding some dimension and varied heights within your product photographs. Having these on hand is one of the best product photography tips because these small props can take your photos from amateur to pro.

bottle flatlay

How Do You Get Started In Product Photography?

Did you know that product photography is one of the most lucrative fields of photography you can get involved with? It’s one of the reasons why we love helping photographers get set up in this field. Having said that, if you want to become a successful product photographer, you will likely need some high-end equipment in order to ensure you’re capturing high-quality photos that highlight the product. 

Because of this, before you dive too deep into getting your product photography business set up, you’ll want to think carefully about whether or not this style of photography is what you want to specialize in. 

If you’ve thought about it and you feel confident that this is a style of photography that you could see yourself pursuing, follow these steps to become a product photographer. 


Step 1: Practice your photography skills (focus on light)

If you want to become a product photographer, you need to have a diverse set of photography skills. 

As mentioned above, there are various types of product photography, and as a professional, you will be required to master all the different types. 

This means shooting both big products and small ones, stylized images and white backdrop images, close-up images and big-picture images, and, with lifestyle product photos, you’ll even be likely working with models. 

Needless to say, you need to be skilled as a photographer if this is a field you want to go into.

In particular, you’ll want to start paying attention to lighting. Lighting tends to be one of the key differentiating factors between professional product photography and amateur shots. There are very specific techniques and multi-light setups involved to achieve the desired final look. Not to mention, you can’t have shadows or dark images when you’re trying to sell a product through an image. 

Brush up on your photography skills before you start pursuing product photography to ensure that your skills are up to par.   


Step 2: Build a portfolio 


As much as we recommend honing your skills in step one, it’s likely that, as an artist, you will likely never feel like your skills are perfect. The point of practicing is to get familiar with this style of photography and ensure it’s something that you can see yourself pursuing. 

Once you have a firm grip on your photography skills, it’s time to start setting up your portfolio. 

Don’t be concerned about setting up your portfolio before you have professional experience. We always recommend building your portfolio ASAP regardless of what type of photographer you are. The sooner you have your portfolio, the sooner you can start booking professional clients. 


Tips for your portfolio 


  • Your portfolio doesn’t have to be all professional photos, but they do need to be professional quality. If you don’t have clients yet, shoot mock product photos to show off your skills. 

  • Consider working with clients at a discounted rate or even for free if you want to bulk up your portfolio. 

  • Only include your best work. You don’t need to include every photography project you’ve ever worked on in your portfolio. This is especially true if you have projects that are irrelevant to the type of work you want to do.


Check out our guide for more tips on building a portfolio as a product photographer. Step

3: Get the right equipment 


When you’re just starting to build your portfolio and working with clients in the initial stages of your career, purchasing every piece of equipment might not be necessary. However, as your experience grows, you’ll find that you need specific gear to achieve the shot you want. You may also find that having the right equipment will help you upgrade the quality of your clientele. 

In some instances, you may want to get your equipment sooner rather than later. When you purchase your equipment really just depends on the growth of your business. If you have clients who expect a certain style of photography that requires higher-end equipment, it is likely time to start considering some upgrades. 


Equipment that you might want to consider purchasing includes: 


  • Shooting table 

  • Lightbox 

  • Studio lights - a mix of strobes and continuous lights

  • Tripod 

  • A DSLR camera (recommended for any professional photography pursuit)

  • Photo editing software for retouching 


Keep in mind that all of these things aren’t necessary for the beginning stages of your career, and some of them can be made into a DIY project if you’re on a budget. However, as you become more experienced, you will likely be expected to have professional equipment. In fact, if you advance far into product photography, you will likely want to have your own studio specifically for shooting product photography. 


Step 4: Book clients 


By now it should be obvious that there’s no one linear path when becoming a product photographer. Some photographers might find they are able to book clients before they purchase equipment, and others might find the equipment gives them the edge to start booking higher-paying clients. In addition, some of you might be able to find clients to work with during the initial stages of your career, and others might take a more DIY approach when adding projects to their portfolio. 

Regardless, every product photographer needs clients, and in most cases, will need to go out and find those clients with marketing tactics, word of mouth, and strong positive reviews.

This is why having a website and a portfolio set up from the beginning is so important. It provides potential clients with a way to see your work and easily connect with you. 


For more tips on becoming a product photographer and booking those dream clients, this guide all about product photographyDid you know that product photography is one of the most lucrative fields of photography you can get involved with? It’s one of the reasons why we love helping photographers get set up in this field. Having said that, if you want to become a successful product photographer, you will likely need some high-end equipment in order to ensure you’re capturing high-quality photos that highlight the product.  will help.

Because of this, before you dive too deep into getting your product photography business set up, you’ll want to think carefully about whether or not this style of photography is what you want to specialize in. 

If you’ve thought about it and you feel confident that this is a style of photography that you could see yourself pursuing, follow these steps to become a product photographer. 


Step 1: Practice your photography skills (focus on light)


If you want to become a product photographer, you need to have a diverse set of photography skills. 

As mentioned above, there are various types of product photography, and as a professional, you will be required to master all the different types. 

This means shooting both big products and small ones, stylized images and white backdrop images, close-up images and big-picture images, and, with lifestyle product photos, you’ll even be likely working with models. 

Needless to say, you need to be skilled as a photographer if this is a field you want to go into.

In particular, you’ll want to start paying attention to lighting. Lighting tends to be one of the key differentiating factors between professional product photography and amateur shots. There are very specific techniques and multi-light setups involved to achieve the desired final look. Not to mention, you can’t have shadows or dark images when you’re trying to sell a product through an image. 

Brush up on your photography skills before you start pursuing product photography to ensure that your skills are up to par.   


Step 2: Build a portfolio 


As much as we recommend honing your skills in step one, it’s likely that, as an artist, you will likely never feel like your skills are perfect. The point of practicing is to get familiar with this style of photography and ensure it’s something that you can see yourself pursuing. 

Once you have a firm grip on your photography skills, it’s time to start setting up your portfolio. 

Don’t be concerned about setting up your portfolio before you have professional experience. We always recommend building your portfolio ASAP regardless of what type of photographer you are. The sooner you have your portfolio, the sooner you can start booking professional clients. 


Tips for your portfolio 


  • Your portfolio doesn’t have to be all professional photos, but they do need to be professional quality. If you don’t have clients yet, shoot mock product photos to show off your skills. 

  • Consider working with clients at a discounted rate or even for free if you want to bulk up your portfolio. 

  • Only include your best work. You don’t need to include every photography project you’ve ever worked on in your portfolio. This is especially true if you have projects that are irrelevant to the type of work you want to do.


Check out our guide for more tips on building a portfolio as a product photographer

Step 3: Get the right equipment 


When you’re just starting to build your portfolio and working with clients in the initial stages of your career, purchasing every piece of equipment might not be necessary. However, as your experience grows, you’ll find that you need specific gear to achieve the shot you want. You may also find that having the right equipment will help you upgrade the quality of your clientele. 

In some instances, you may want to get your equipment sooner rather than later. When you purchase your equipment really just depends on the growth of your business. If you have clients who expect a certain style of photography that requires higher-end equipment, it is likely time to start considering some upgrades. 

Equipment that you might want to consider purchasing includes: 


  • Shooting table 

  • Lightbox 

  • Studio lights - a mix of strobes and continuous lights

  • Tripod 

  • A DSLR camera (recommended for any professional photography pursuit)

  • Photo editing software for retouching 


Keep in mind that all of these things aren’t necessary for the beginning stages of your career, and some of them can be made into a DIY project if you’re on a budget. However, as you become more experienced, you will likely be expected to have professional equipment. In fact, if you advance far into product photography, you will likely want to have your own studio specifically for shooting product photography. 


Step 4: Book clients 


By now it should be obvious that there’s no one linear path when becoming a product photographer. Some photographers might find they are able to book clients before they purchase equipment, and others might find the equipment gives them the edge to start booking higher-paying clients. In addition, some of you might be able to find clients to work with during the initial stages of your career, and others might take a more DIY approach when adding projects to their portfolio. 

Regardless, every product photographer needs clients, and in most cases, will need to go out and find those clients with marketing tactics, word of mouth, and strong positive reviews.

This is why having a website and a portfolio set up from the beginning is so important. It provides potential clients with a way to see your work and easily connect with you. 


For more tips on becoming a product photographer and booking those dream clients, this guide all about product photography will help.

How Much Should I Charge for Product Photography?

As with all types of photography, pricing yourself really boils down to three main components: 

  • Your experience

  • The quality of your work

  • The amount of time spent on a project 


As you become more experienced, you’ll find that you’re able to increase your prices, so don’t worry if your prices seem low in the beginning. As we said earlier, in the beginning, you may even want to consider working at a discounted price or for free in order to bulk up your portfolio. 

If you’re still not sure what to charge, you’ll want to take a look at what your competition is charging. Look for product photographers in your city with a similar experience level to you. While you don’t have to charge the exact same rate that they do, you don’t want to charge too much and drive clients away, but you also don’t want to charge too little or you’ll be selling yourself short. Find the perfect medium. 

In addition, you’ll need to decide on your pricing structure. You have three choices:

  • Hourly rate (a set amount you make for each hour worked)

  • Flat rate (a set rate you receive after a project is complete)

  • Per photo (a set rate you charge based on how many photos the client wants)

Choosing your pricing structure 


There are benefits to all of these pricing structures, and choosing which one works for you will likely depend on your clients’ preferences, how familiar you are with how long a project takes you, and how long you’ve been working with a client. 

You’ll likely find that hourly rates work well if you’re new to product photography and don’t know how long a project will take you. In addition, you might choose to go the hourly rate if you’re working with a new client who may have different requirements and expectations. 

Hourly rates are also a great choice because it ensures you’re paid for every hour of work. 

On the other hand, there are also flat rates, which tend to be popular with product photography. You might choose to go with a flat rate if you have a lot of experience and know how long projects will take you. In addition, flat rates work well in product photography when a client has multiple new products that they need shot each month. 

If you want to go the per photo route, you’re essentially combining an hourly rate with a flat rate. In other words, you have a flat rate you charge per photo, but the price goes up as the number of photos goes up, and, as we know, the more photos you’re taking, the more time you’re putting in. 

You can also choose to have both a flat rate and an hourly rate, and use different rates for different scenarios. You can even experiment with both and see what works best for you. Just be sure to stick with one or the other when working with clients. Switching between different rates can be confusing and might cost you clients. 

Other factors to consider for pricing 

We don’t want to complicate pricing too much, especially in these beginning stages, but some important things to keep in mind when pricing yourself can include: 

  • How much editing is required 

  • Whether you’re including reshoots in your pricing 

  • If you’re working with models 

  • Do you need to style the photoshoot?

  • In some instances, you may be expected to provide props or other supplies. Make sure you include these incidentals in your pricing as well.


Are you ready to start your product photography business?


We hope you’re feeling more confident about going into product photography. As one of the more lucrative styles of photography, this can be an amazing option for anyone who wants to build a successful career as a photographer. 

Just be sure that you get that portfolio set ASAP. It’s one of the most essential steps for gaining clients and showing off your work. 

If you need help with your portfolio, don’t forget that Format has professionally designed templates that can help you start attracting all the right clients to your product photography business. 

Get started today.

What Are Some Product Photography Examples?

One of the best ways to get a better understanding of what a product photographer does is to look at examples of professionals’ work. Read on for some of the best examples of product photography.


RG Medestomas 


Right off the bat when you check out RG’s portfolio you’re met with imagery that shows off his work and personal photography style. As a photographer making your work and your style obvious right from the beginning is extremely important. 

In addition, this portfolio acts as a great example of how product photography doesn’t have to be just plain, white backdrop photos. RG’s photos are styled, full of color, and shot with creativity. 

If you’re interested in putting together a portfolio that is similar to RG’s, check out the Peak theme from Format. 


Timothy Hogan 


Timothy Hogan’s portfolio is the perfect example of how you can specialize in a certain product that you photograph without pigeonholing yourself. Timothy specializes in four products types: jewelry, fragrance, beverage, and luxury goods. 

This is immediately clear right when you check out his portfolio because he has separated and organized all the various products for easy viewing.

If you’re interested in putting together a portfolio that is similar to Timothy’s, check out the Motion theme from Format. 


Alex Kapustin 


Alex Kapustin’s portfolio is an amazing example of how you can get creative with your product photography. He shows us that it’s certainly not all white backdrops and close-up shots. His portfolio highlights the use of shadow, vibrant colors, and post-production effects. 

Plus, if you’re looking for some inspiration on how you can organize your portfolio, this is a great example of how you can use your menu bar to organize your various projects into easy-to-navigate labels. 

If you’re interested in putting together a portfolio that is similar to Alex’s, check out the Amazon theme from Format. 


And, if you’re thinking that product photography might be a field you want to go into, we highly recommend looking at more examples of product photographers’ work. This list of product photography examples will help.

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